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Anna

The Bible

Bible Usage:

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: Yes
  • Included in Hitchcocks: Yes
  • Included in Naves: Yes
  • Included in Smiths: Yes
  • Included in Websters: No
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: Yes
  • Included in BDB: No

Strongs Concordance:

 

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Anna

Grace, an aged widow, the daughter of Phanuel. She was a "prophetess," like Miriam, Deborah, and Huldah (2 Chronicles 34:22). After seven years of married life her husband died, and during her long widowhood she daily attended the temple services. When she was eighty-four years old, she entered the temple at the moment when the aged Simeon uttered his memorable words of praise and thanks to God that he had fulfilled his ancient promise in sending his Son into the world (Luke 2:36, 37).


Hitchcock's Names Dictionary
Anna

gracious; one who gives


Naves Topical Index
Anna

A devout widow.
Luke 2:36-37


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Anna

(grace), a "prophetess" in Jerusalem at the time of our Lord's Presentation in the temple. (Luke 2:36) She was of the tribe of Asher.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Annalist

AN'NALIST, noun [See Annals.] A writer of annals.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Annalize

AN'NALIZE, verb transitive To record; to write annals. [Not much used.]


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Annals

AN'NALS, noun plural [Latin amnales, annalis, from annus, a year, the root of which may be the Celtic an, ain, a great circle. Varro says the word annus signifies a great circle.]

1. A species of history digested in order of time, or a relation of events in chronological order, each event being recorded under the year in which it happened. annals differ from history, in merely relating events, without observations on the motives, causes and consequences, which, in history, are more diffusively illustrated.

2. The books containing annals as the annals of Tacitus.


Easton's Bible Dictionary
Annas

Was high priest A.D. 7-14. In A.D. 25 Caiaphas, who had married the daughter of Annas (John 18:13), was raised to that office, and probably Annas was now made president of the Sanhedrim, or deputy or coadjutor of the high priest, and thus was also called high priest along with Caiaphas (Luke 3:2). By the Mosaic law the high-priesthood was held for life (Numbers 3:10); and although Annas had been deposed by the Roman procurator, the Jews may still have regarded him as legally the high priest. Our Lord was first brought before Annas, and after a brief questioning of him (John 18:19-23) was sent to Caiaphas, when some members of the Sanhedrim had met, and the first trial of Jesus took place (Matthew 26:57-68). This examination of our Lord before Annas is recorded only by John. Annas was president of the Sanhedrim before which Peter and John were brought (Acts 4:6).


Hitchcock's Names Dictionary
Annas

one who answers; humble


Naves Topical Index
Annas

Associate high priest with Caiaphas.
Luke 3:2; John 18:13; John 18:19; John 18:24; Acts 4:6


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Annas

(humble), the son of one Seth was appointed high priest A.D. 7 by Quirinus, the imperial governor of Syria, but was obliged by Valerius Gratus, procurator of Judea, to give way to Ism'l, son of Phabi, at the beginning of the reign of Tiberius, A.D. 14. About A.D. 25 Joseph Caiaphas, son-in-law of An-nas, became high priest, (John 18:13) but in Luke 3:2 Annas and Caiaphas are both called high priests. Our Lord's first hearing, (John 18:13) was before Annas, who then sent him bound to Caiaphas. Some maintain that the two, Annas and Caiaphas, were together at the head of the Jewish people,

Caiaphas as actual high priest, Annas as resident of the Sanhedrin- (Acts 4:6) Others again suppose that Annas held the office of sagin , or substitute of the high priest; others still that Annas held the title and was really the ruling power. He lived to old age, having had five sons high priests.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Annats

AN'NATS, noun [Latin annus.]

A year's income of a spiritual living; the first fruits, originally given to the Pope, upon the decease of a bishop, abbot or parish clerk, and paid by his successor. In England, they were, at the reformation, vested in the king, and in the reign of Queen Anne, restored to the church, and appropriated to the augmentation of poor livings.