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Bath

The Bible

Bible Usage:

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: Yes
  • Included in Hitchcocks: No
  • Included in Naves: Yes
  • Included in Smiths: Yes
  • Included in Websters: Yes
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: No
  • Included in BDB: Yes

Strongs Concordance:

 

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Bath

A Hebrew liquid measure, the tenth part of an homer (1 Kings 7:26, 38; Ezekiel 45:10, 14). It contained 8 gallons 3 quarts of our measure. "Ten acres of vineyard shall yield one bath" (Isaiah 5:10) denotes great unproductiveness.


Naves Topical Index
Bath

A Hebrew measure for liquids containing about eight gallons, three quarts.
1 Kings 7:26; 1 Kings 7:38; Ezra 7:22; Isaiah 5:10; Ezekiel 45:10-11; Ezekiel 45:14


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Bath

Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Bath

B'ATH, noun

1. A place for bathing; a convenient vat or receptacle of water for persons to plunge or wash their bodies in. Baths are warm or tepid, hot or cold, more generally called warm and cold. They are also natural or artificial. Natural baths are those which consist of spring water, either hot or cold, which is often impregnated with iron, and called chalybeate, or with sulphur, carbonic acid, and other mineral qualities. These waters are often very efficacious in scorbutic, bilious, dyspeptic and other complaints.

2. A place in which heat is applied to a body immersed in some substance. Thus,

A dry bath is made of hot sand, ashes, salt, or other matter, for the purpose of applying heat to a body immersed in them.

A vapor bath is formed by filling an apartment with hot steam or vapor, in which the body sweats copiously, as in Russia; or the term is used for the application of hot steam to a diseased part of the body.

A metalline bath is water impregnated with iron or other metallic substance, and applied to a diseased part.

In chimistry, a wet bath is formed by hot water in which is placed a vessel containing the matter which requires a softer heat than the naked fire.

In medicine, the animal bath is made by wrapping the part affected in a warm skin just taken from an animal.

3. A house for bathing. In some eastern countries, baths are very magnificent edifices.

4. A Hebrew measure containing the tenth of a homer, or seven gallons and four pints, as a measure for liquids; and three pecks and three pints, as a dry measure.


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Bath, Bathing

This was a prescribed part of the Jewish ritual of purification in cases of accident, or of leprous or ordinary uncleanness, (Leviticus 15; 16:28; 22:6; Numbers 19:7; 19; 2 Samuel 11:2,4; 2 Kings 5:10) as also after mourning, which always implied defilement. (Ruth 3:3; 2 Samuel 12:20) The eastern climate made bathing essential alike to health and pleasure, to which luxury added the use of perfumes. (Esther 2:12) Judith 10.3; Susan 17. The "pools," such as that of Siloam and Hezekiah, (2 Kings 20:20; Nehemiah 3:15,16; Isaiah 22:11; John 9:7) often sheltered by porticos, (John 5:2) are the first indications we have of public bathing accommodation.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Bathe

BATHE, verb transitive

1. To wash the body, or some part of it, by immersion, as in a bath; it often differs from ordinary washing in a longer application of water, to the body or to a particular part, as for the purpose of cleansing or stimulating the skin.

2. To wash or moisten, for the purpose of making soft and supple, or for cleansing, as a wound.

3. To moisten or suffuse with a liquid; as, to bathe in tears or blood.

BATHE, verb intransitive To be or lie in a bath; to be in water, or in other liquid, or to be immersed in a fluid, as in a bath; as, to bathe in fiery floods.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Bathed

BA'THED, participle passive Washed as in a bath; moistened with a liquid; bedewed.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Bather

BA'THER, noun One who bathes; one who immerses himself in water, or who applies a liquid to himself or to another.


Naves Topical Index
Bathing

See Ablution; Purification
Ablution; Purification


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Bathing

BA'THING, participle present tense Washing by immersion, or by applying a liquid; moistening; fomenting.

BA'THING, noun The act of bathing or washing the body in water.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Bathing-tub

BA'THING-TUB, noun A vessel for bathing, usually made either of wood or tin. In the Royal Library at Paris, I saw a bathing-tub of porphyry, of beautiful form and exquisite workmanship.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Bathos

BA'THOS, noun The art of sinking in poetry.


Easton's Bible Dictionary
Bathrabbim

Daughter of many, the name of one of the gates of the city of Heshbon, near which were pools (Song of Solomon 7:4).


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Bathrabbim

(daughter of many), The gate of, One of the gates of the ancient city of heshbon. (Solomon 7:4,5)


Naves Topical Index
Bath-Rabbim

A gate in the city of Heshbon.
Song of Solomon 7:4


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Bath-room

B'ATH-ROOM, noun An apartment for bathing.


Easton's Bible Dictionary
Baths

The use of the bath was very frequent among the Hebrews (Leviticus 14:8; Numbers 19:19, ect.). The high priest at his inauguration (Leviticus 8:6), and on the day of atonement, was required to bathe himself (16:4, 24). The "pools" mentioned in Nehemiah 3:15, 16, 2 Kings 20:20, Isaiah 22:11, John 9:7, were public bathing-places.


Easton's Bible Dictionary
Bathsheba

Daughter of the oath, or of seven, called also Bath-shu'a (1 Chronicles 3:5), was the daughter of Eliam (2 Samuel 11:3) or Ammiel (1 Chronicles 3:5), and wife of Uriah the Hittite. David committed adultery with her (2 Samuel 11:4, 5; Psalms 51:1). The child born in adultery died (2 Samuel 12:15-19). After her husband was slain (11:15) she was married to David (11:27), and became the mother of Solomon (12:24; 1 Kings 1:11; 2:13). She took a prominent part in securing the succession of Solomon to the throne (1 Kings 1:11, 16-21).


Hitchcock's Names Dictionary
Bathsheba

the seventh daughter; the daughter of satiety


Naves Topical Index
Bath-Sheba

Wife of Uriah and later wife of David.

Called Bathshua
1 Chronicles 3:5

Adultery of
2 Samuel 11:2-5

Solomon's mother
1 Kings 1:11-31; 1 Kings 2:13-21; 1 Chronicles 3:5


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Bathsheba, or Bathsheba

(daughter of the oath), (2 Samuel 11:3) etc., also called Bath-shua in (1 Chronicles 3:5) the daughter of Eliam, (2 Samuel 11:3) or Ammiel, (1 Chronicles 3:5) the son of Ahithophel, (2 Samuel 23:34) and wife of Uriah the Hittite. (B.C. 1035.) The child which was the fruit of her adulterous intercourse with David died; but after marriage she became the mother of four sons, Solomon, (Matthew 1:6) Shimea, Shobab and Nathan. When Adonijah attempted to set aside the succession promised to Solomon, Bath-sheba informed the king of the conspiracy. (1 Kings 1:11,15,23) After the accession of Solomon, she, as queen-mother, requested permission of her son for Adonijah to take in marriage Abishag the Shunammite. (1 Kings 2:21-25)


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Bathshua

[BATH-SHEBA]


Hitchcock's Names Dictionary
Bathsuha

same as Bathsheba