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Enoch

The Bible

Bible Usage:

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: Yes
  • Included in Hitchcocks: Yes
  • Included in Naves: Yes
  • Included in Smiths: Yes
  • Included in Websters: No
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: Yes
  • Included in BDB: Yes

Strongs Concordance:

 

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Enoch

Initiated.

1. The eldest son of Cain (Genesis 4:17), who built a city east of Eden in the land of Nod, and called it "after the name of his son Enoch." This is the first "city" mentioned in Scripture.

2. The son of Jared, and father of Methuselah (Genesis 5:21; Luke 3:37). His father was one hundred and sixty-two years old when he was born. After the birth of Methuselah, Enoch "walked with God three hundred years" (Genesis 5:22-24), when he was translated without tasting death. His whole life on earth was three hundred and sixty-five years. He was the "seventh from Adam" (Jude 1:14), as distinguished from the son of Cain, the third from Adam. He is spoken of in the catalogue of Old Testament worthies in the Epistle to the Hebrews (11:5). When he was translated, only Adam, so far as recorded, had as yet died a natural death, and Noah was not yet born. Mention is made of Enoch's prophesying only in Jude 1:14.


Hitchcock's Names Dictionary
Enoch

dedicated; disciplined


Naves Topical Index
Enoch

1. Eldest son of Cain
Genesis 4:17-18

2. A city built by Cain
Genesis 4:17

3. Father of Methuselah

Translation of
Genesis 5:18-24; Luke 3:37; Hebrews 11:5; Jude 1:14

Called Henoch
1 Chronicles 1:3


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Enoch

(dedicated).

  1. The eldest son of Cain, (Genesis 4:17) who called after his name the city which he built. (Genesis 4:18) (B.C. 3870.)
  2. The son of Jared and father of Methuselah. (Genesis 5:21) ff.; Luke 3:37 (B.C. 3378-3013.) In the Epistle of Jude (Jude 1:14) he described as "the seventh from Adam;" and the number is probably noticed as conveying the idea of divine completion and rest, while Enoch was himself a type of perfected humanity. After the birth of Methuselah it is said, (Genesis 5:22-24) that Enoch "walked with God three hundred years... and he was not; for God took him." The phrase "walked with God" is elsewhere only used of Noah, (Genesis 6:9) cf. Genesis 17:1 etc., and is to be explained of a prophetic life spent in immediate converse with the spiritual world. Like Elijah, he was translated without seeing death. In the Epistle to the Hebrews the spring and issue of Enoch's life are clearly marked. Both the Latin and Greek fathers commonly coupled Enoch and Elijah as historic witnesses of the possibility of a resurrection of the body and of a true human existence in glory. (Revelation 11:3)


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Enoch, the Book of

The first trance of the existence of this work is found in the Epistle of (Jude 1:14,15) An apocryphal book called Enoch was known at a very early date, but was lost sight of until 1773, when Bruce brought with him on his return from Egypt three MSS. containing the complete Ethiopic translation. In its present shape the book consists of a series of revelations supposed to have been given to Enoch and Noah, which extend to the most varied aspects of nature and life. And are designed to offer a comprehensive vindication of the action of Providence. Notwithstanding the quotation in Jude, and the wide circulation of the book itself, the apocalypse of Enoch was uniformly and distinctly separated from the canonical Scriptures. Its authorship and date are unknown.