Loading...

Nehushta

The Bible

Bible Usage:

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: Yes
  • Included in Hitchcocks: Yes
  • Included in Naves: Yes
  • Included in Smiths: Yes
  • Included in Websters: No
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: No
  • Included in BDB: Yes

Strongs Concordance:

 

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Nehushta

Copper, the daughter of Elnathan of Jerusalem, and the wife of Jehoiakin (2 Kings 24:8), king of Judah.


Hitchcock's Names Dictionary
Nehushta

made of brass


Naves Topical Index
Nehushta

Wife of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, and mother of Jehoiachin.
2 Kings 24:6; 2 Kings 24:8


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Nehushta

(brass), the daughter of Elnathan of Jerusalem, wife of Jehoiakim and mother of Jehoiachin, kings of Judah. (2 Kings 24:8) (B.C. 616.)


Easton's Bible Dictionary
Nehushtan

Of copper; a brazen thing a name of contempt given to the serpent Moses had made in the wilderness (Numbers 21:8), and which Hezekiah destroyed because the children of Israel began to regard it as an idol and "burn incense to it." The lapse of nearly one thousand years had invested the "brazen serpent" with a mysterious sanctity; and in order to deliver the people from their infatuation, and impress them with the idea of its worthlessness, Hezekiah called it, in contempt, "Nehushtan," a brazen thing, a mere piece of brass (2 Kings 18:4).


Hitchcock's Names Dictionary
Nehushtan

a trifling thing of brass


Naves Topical Index
Nehushtan

The brazen serpent.
2 Kings 18:4


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Nehushtan

(a thing of brass), the name by which the brazen serpent made by Moses in the wilderness, (Numbers 21:9) was worshipped in the time of Hezekiah. (2 Kings 18:4) It is evident that our translators by their rendering "and he called it Nehushtan" understood that the subject of the sentence is Hezekiah and that when he destroyed the brazen serpent he gave it the name Nehushtan "a brazen thing" in token of his utter contempt. But it is better to understand the Hebrew as referring to the name by which the serpent was generally known, the subject of the verb being indefinite

"and one called it 'Nehushtan.'"