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Dog

The Bible

Bible Usage:

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: Yes
  • Included in Hitchcocks: No
  • Included in Naves: Yes
  • Included in Smiths: Yes
  • Included in Websters: Yes
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: Yes
  • Included in BDB: Yes

Strongs Concordance:

 

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Dog

Frequently mentioned both in the Old and New Testaments. Dogs were used by the Hebrews as a watch for their houses (Isaiah 56:10), and for guarding their flocks (Job 30:1). There were also then as now troops of semi-wild dogs that wandered about devouring dead bodies and the offal of the streets (1 Kings 14:11; 16:4; 21:19, 23; 22:38; Psalms 59:6, 14).

As the dog was an unclean animal, the terms "dog," "dog's head," "dead dog," were used as terms of reproach or of humiliation (1 Samuel 24:14; 2 Samuel 3:8; 9:8; 16:9). Paul calls false apostles "dogs" (Philippians 3:2). Those who are shut out of the kingdom of heaven are also so designated (Revelation 22:15). Persecutors are called "dogs" (Psalms 22:16). Hazael's words, "Thy servant which is but a dog" (2 Kings 8:13), are spoken in mock humility=impossible that one so contemptible as he should attain to such power.


Naves Topical Index
Dog

Price of, not to be brought into the sanctuary
Deuteronomy 23:18

Shepherd dogs
Job 30:1

Habits of:

Licking blood
1 Kings 21:19; 1 Kings 22:38

Licking sores
Luke 16:21

Returns to his vomit
Proverbs 26:11; 2 Peter 2:22

Lapping of
Judges 7:5

Dumb and sleeping
Isaiah 56:10-11

Greyhound
Proverbs 30:31

Epithet of contempt
1 Samuel 17:43; 1 Samuel 24:14; 2 Samuel 3:8; 2 Samuel 9:8; 2 Samuel 16:9; 2 Kings 8:13; Isaiah 56:10-11; Matthew 15:26

Figurative
Philippians 3:2; Revelation 22:15


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Dog

an animal frequently mentioned in Scripture. It was used by the hebrews as a watch for their houses, (Isaiah 56:10) and for guarding their flocks. (Job 30:1) Then also, as now troops of hungry and semi-wild dogs used to wander about the fields and the streets of the cities, devouring dead bodies and other offal, (1 Kings 14:11; 21:19,23; 22:38; Psalms 59:6) and thus became so savage and fierce and such objects of dislike that fierce and cruel enemies are poetically styled dogs in (Psalms 22:16,20) moreover the dog being an unclean animal, (Isaiah 66:3) the epithets dog, dead dog, dog's head, were used as terms of reproach or of humility in speaking of one's self. (1 Samuel 24:14; 2 Samuel 3:8; 9:8; 16:9; 2 Kings 8:13)


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Dog

DOG, noun

1. A species of quadrupeds, belonging to the genus Canis, of many varieties, as the mastiff, the hound, the spaniel, the shepherds dog the terrier, the harrier, the bloodhound, etc.

2. It is used for male, when applied to several other animals; as a dog-fox; a dog-otter; dog-ape. It is prefixed to other words, denoting what is mean, degenerate or worthless; as dog-rose.

3. An andiron, so named from the figure of a dogs head on the top.

4. A term of reproach or contempt given to a man.

5. A constellation called Sirius or Canicula. [See Dog-day.]

6. An iron hook or bar with a sharp fang, used by seamen.

7. An iron used by sawyers to fasten a log of timber in a saw-pit.

8. A gay young man; a buck. [Not in use.]

To give or throw to the dogs, is to throw away, as useless.

To go to the dogs, is to be ruined.

DOG, verb transitive To hunt; to follow insidiously or indefatigably; to follow close; to urge; to worry with importunity.

I have been pursued, dogged and and way-laid.