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Eagle

The Bible

Bible Usage:

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: Yes
  • Included in Hitchcocks: No
  • Included in Naves: Yes
  • Included in Smiths: Yes
  • Included in Websters: Yes
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: Yes
  • Included in BDB: Yes

Strongs Concordance:

 

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Eagle

Eagle - (Herb. nesher; properly the griffon vulture or great vulture, so called from its tearing its prey with its beak), referred to for its swiftness of flight (Deuteronomy 28:49; 2 Samuel 1:23), its mounting high in the air (Job 39:27), its strength (Psalms 103:5), its setting its nest in high places (Jeremiah 49:16), and its power of vision (Job 39:27-30).

This "ravenous bird" is a symbol of those nations whom God employs and sends forth to do a work of destruction, sweeping away whatever is decaying and putrescent (Matthew 24:28; Isaiah 46:11; Ezekiel 39:4; Deuteronomy 28:49; Jeremiah 4:13; 48:40). It is said that the eagle sheds his feathers in the beginning of spring, and with fresh plumage assumes the appearance of youth. To this, allusion is made in Psalms 103:5 and Isaiah 40:31. God's care over his people is likened to that of the eagle in training its young to fly (Exodus 19:4; Deuteronomy 32:11, 12). An interesting illustration is thus recorded by Sir Humphry Davy;, "I once saw a very interesting sight above the crags of Ben Nevis. Two parent eagles were teaching their offspring, two young birds, the maneuvers of flight. They began by rising from the top of the mountain in the eye of the sun. It was about mid-day, and bright for the climate. They at first made small circles, and the young birds imitated them. They paused on their wings, waiting till they had made their flight, and then took a second and larger gyration, always rising toward the sun, and enlarging their circle of flight so as to make a gradually ascending spiral. The young ones still and slowly followed, apparently flying better as they mounted; and they continued this sublime exercise, always rising till they became mere points in the air, and the young ones were lost, and afterwards their parents, to our aching sight." (See Isaiah 40:31.)

There have been observed in Palestine four distinct species of eagles, (1) the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos); (2) the spotted eagle (Aquila naevia); (3) the common species, the imperial eagle (Aquila heliaca); and (4) the Circaetos gallicus, which preys on reptiles. The eagle was unclean by the Levitical law (Leviticus 11:13; Deuteronomy 14:12).


Naves Topical Index
Eagle

Smith's Bible Dictionary
Eagle

(Heb. nesher , i.e. a tearer with the beak). At least four distinct kinds of eagles have been observed in Palestine, viz., the golden eagle, Aquila chrys'tos , the spotted eagle, Aquila n'via , the imperial eagle, Aquila heliaca , and the very common Circ'tos gallicus . The Hebrew nesher may stand for any of these different species, though perhaps more particular reference to the golden and imperial eagles and the griffon vulture may be intended. The passage in Micah, (Micah 1:16) "enlarge thy baldness as the eagle," may refer to the griffon vulture, Vultur fulvus , in which case the simile is peculiarly appropriate, for the whole head and neck of this bird are destitute of true feathers. The "eagles" of (Matthew 24:28; Luke 17:37) may include the Vultur fulvus and Neophron percnopterus ; though, as eagles frequently prey upon dead bodies, there is no necessity to restrict the Greek word to the Vulturid' . The figure of an eagle is now and has long been a favorite military ensign. The Persians so employed it; a fact which illustrates the passage in (Isaiah 46:11) The same bird was similarly employed by the Assyrians and the Romans.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Eagle

E'AGLE, noun [Latin aquila.]

1. A rapacious fowl of the genus Falco. The beak is crooked and furnished with a cere at the base, and the tongue is cloven or bifid. There are several species, as, the bald or white-headed eagle the sea eagle or ossifrage, the golden eagle etc.

The eagle is one of the largest species of fowls, has a keen sight, and preys on small animals, fish, etc. He lives to a great age; and it is said that one died at Vienna, after a confinement of a hundred and four years. On account of the elevation and rapidity of his flight, and of his great strength, he is called the king of birds. Hence the figure of an eagle was made the standard of the Romans, and a spread eagle is a principal figure in the arms of the United States of America. Hence also in heraldry, it is one of the most noble bearings in armory.

2. A gold coin of the United States, of the value of ten dollars, or forty-five shillings sterling.

3. A constellation in the northern hemisphere, having its right wing contiguous to the equinoctial.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Eagle-eyed

E'AGLE-EYED, adjective Sharpsighted as an eagle; having an acute sight.

1. Discerning; having acute intellectual vision.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Eagle-sighted

E'AGLE-SIGHTED, adjective Having acute sight.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Eagle-speed

E'AGLE-SPEED,noun Swiftness like that of an eagle.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Eagless

E'AGLESS, noun A female or hen eagle.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Eagle-stone

E'AGLE-STONE, noun Etite, a variety of argillaceous oxyd of iron, occurring in masses varying from the size of a walnut to that of a man's head. Their form is spherical, oval or nearly reniform, or sometimes like a parallelopiped with rounded edges and angles. They have a rough surface, and are essentially composed of concentric layers. These nodules often embrace at the center a kernel or nucleus, sometimes movable, and always differing from the exterior in color, density and fracture. To these hollow nodules the ancients gave the name of eagle-stones, from an opinion that the eagle transported them to her nest to facilitate the laying of her eggs.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Eaglet

E'AGLET, noun A young eagle or a diminutive eagle.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Eagle-winged

E'AGLE-WINGED, adjective Having the wings of an eagle; swift as an eagle.