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King James Bible Dictionary

 

Cups

The Bible

Bible Usage:

  • cup used 68 times.
  • cups used 6 times.

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: Yes
  • Included in Hitchcocks: No
  • Included in Naves: No
  • Included in Smiths: Yes
  • Included in Websters: Yes
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: Yes
  • Included in BDB: Yes

Strongs Concordance:

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Cup

A wine-cup (Genesis 40:11, 21), various forms of which are found on Assyrian and Egyptian monuments. All Solomon's drinking vessels were of gold (1 Kings 10:21). The cups mentioned in the New Testament were made after Roman and Greek models, and were sometimes of gold (Revelation 17:4).

The art of divining by means of a cup was practiced in Egypt (Genesis 44:2-17), and in the East generally.

The "cup of salvation" (Psalms 116:13) is the cup of thanksgiving for the great salvation. The "cup of consolation" (Jeremiah 16:7) refers to the custom of friends sending viands and wine to console relatives in mourning (Proverbs 31:6). In 1 Corinthians 10:16, the "cup of blessing" is contrasted with the "cup of devils" (1 Corinthians 10:21). The sacramental cup is the "cup of blessing," because of blessing pronounced over it (Matthew 26:27; Luke 22:17). The "portion of the cup" (Psalms 11:6; 16:5) denotes one's condition of life, prosperous or adverse. A "cup" is also a type of sensual allurement (Jeremiah 51:7; Proverbs 23:31; Revelation 17:4). We read also of the "cup of astonishment," the "cup of trembling," and the "cup of God's wrath" (Psalms 75:8; Isaiah 51:17; Jeremiah 25:15; Lamentations 4:21; Ezekiel 23:32; Revelation 16:19; comp. Matthew 26:39, 42; John 18:11). The cup is also the symbol of death (Matthew 16:28; Mark 9:1; Hebrews 2:9).


Naves Topical Index
Cup

Smith's Bible Dictionary
Cup

The cups of the Jews, whether of metal or earthenware, were possibly borrowed, in point of shape and design, from Egypt and from the Phoenicians, who were celebrated in that branch of workmanship. Egyptian cups were of various shapes, either with handles or without them. In Solomon's time all his drinking vessels were of gold, none of silver. (1 Kings 10:21) Babylon is compared to a golden cup. (Jeremiah 51:7) The great laver, or "sea," was made with a rim like the rim of a cup (cos), with flowers of lilies," (1 Kings 7:26) a form which the Persepolitan cups resemble. The cups of the New Testament were often no doubt formed on Greek and Roman models. They were sometimes of gold. (Revelation 17:4)


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cup

CUP, noun [Latin , a little cup ]

1. A small vessel of capacity, used commonly to drink out of. It is usually made of metal; as a silver cup; a tin cup But the name is also given to vessels of like shape used for other purposes. It is usually more deep than wide; but tea-cups and coffee-cups are often exceptions.

2. The contents of a cup; the liquor contained in a cup or that it may contain; as a cup of beer. See 1 Corinthians 11:25.

3. In a scriptural sense, sufferings and afflictions; that which is to be received or endured.

O my father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me. Matthew 26:27.

4. Good received; blessings and favors.

My cup runneth over. Psalms 23:5.

Take the cup of salvation, that is, receive the blessings of deliverance and redemption with joy and thanksgiving.

5. Any thing hollow like a cup; as the cup of an acorn. The bell of a flower, and a calyx is called a flower-cup.

6. A glass cup or vessel used for drawing blood in scarification.

CUP and can, familiar companions; the can being the large vessel out of which the cup is filled, and thus the two being constantly associated.

CUPs, in the plural, social entertainment in drinking; merry bout.

Thence from cups to civil broils.

CUP, verb intransitive

1. In surgery, to apply a cupping-glass to procure a discharge of blood from a scarified part of the body.

2. To supply with cups.