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Cush

The Bible

Bible Usage:

  • Cush used 7 times.

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: Yes
  • Included in Hitchcocks: Yes
  • Included in Naves: Yes
  • Included in Smiths: Yes
  • Included in Websters: No
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: No
  • Included in BDB: Yes

Strongs Concordance:

 

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Cush

Black.

1. A son, probably the eldest, of Ham, and the father of Nimrod (Genesis 10:8; 1 Chronicles 1:10). From him the land of Cush seems to have derived its name. The question of the precise locality of the land of Cush has given rise to not a little controversy. The second river of Paradise surrounded the whole land of Cush (Genesis 2:13, R.V.). The term Cush is in the Old Testament generally applied to the countries south of the Israelites. It was the southern limit of Egypt (Ezekiel 29:10, A.V. "Ethiopia," Heb. Cush), with which it is generally associated (Psalms 68:31; Isaiah 18:1; Jeremiah 46:9, etc.). It stands also associated with Elam (Isaiah 11:11), with Persia (Ezekiel 38:5), and with the Sabeans (Isaiah 45:14). From these facts it has been inferred that Cush included Arabia and the country on the west coast of the Red Sea. Rawlinson takes it to be the country still known as Khuzi-stan, on the east side of the Lower Tigris. But there are intimations which warrant the conclusion that there was also a Cush in Africa, the Ethiopia (so called by the Greeks) of Africa. Ezekiel speaks (29:10; comp. 30:4-6) of it as lying south of Egypt. It was the country now known to us as Nubia and Abyssinia (Isaiah 18:1; Zephaniah 3:10, Heb. Cush). In ancient Egyptian inscriptions Ethiopia is termed Kesh. The Cushites appear to have spread along extensive tracts, stretching from the Upper Nile to the Euphrates and Tigris. At an early period there was a stream of migration of Cushites "from Ethiopia, properly so called, through Arabia, Babylonia, and Persia, to Western India." The Hamite races, soon after their arrival in Africa, began to spread north, east, and west. Three branches of the Cushite or Ethiopian stock, moving from Western Asia, settled in the regions contiguous to the Persian Gulf. One branch, called the Cossaeans, settled in the mountainous district on the east of the Tigris, known afterwards as Susiana; another occupied the lower regions of the Euphrates and the Tigris; while a third colonized the southern shores and islands of the gulf, whence they afterwards emigrated to the Mediterranean and settled on the coast of Palestine as the Phoenicians. Nimrod was a great Cushite chief. He conquered the Accadians, a Tauranian race, already settled in Mesopotamia, and founded his kingdom, the Cushites mingling with the Accads, and so forming the Chaldean nation.

2. A Benjamite of this name is mentioned in the title of Psalms 7. "Cush was probably a follower of Saul, the head of his tribe, and had sought the friendship of David for the purpose of 'rewarding evil to him that was at peace with him.'"


Hitchcock's Names Dictionary
Cush

Cushan, Cushi, Ethiopians; blackness


Naves Topical Index
Cush

1. Son of Ham
Genesis 10:6-8; 1 Chronicles 1:8-10

2. A Benjamite, title of
1 Chronicles 19:7

3. Land of

General references
Genesis 2:13; Psalms 68:31; Isaiah 18:1
Ethiopia


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Cush

1. (black), a Benjamite mentioned only in the title to (Psalms 7:1) He was probably a follower of Saul, the head of his tribe. (B.C. 1061).
2. the name of a son of Ham, apparently the eldest, and of a territory or territories occupied by his descendants. The Cushites appear to have spread along tracts extending from the higher Nile to the Euphrates and Tigris. History affords many traces of this relation of Babylonia, Arabia and Ethiopia.
3. geographical. This word occurs as the prefix or suffix to the names of several places in Palestine, some of which are as follows-

  1. BAAL a town of Simeon, named only in (1 Chronicles 4:33) which from the parallel list in (Joshua 19:8) seems to have been identical with BAALATH-BEER.
  2. BAALAH (mistress). A. Another name for KIRJATH-JEARIM, or KIRJATH BAAL, the well-known town now Kuriet el Enab . (Joshua 15:9,10; 1 Chronicles 13:6) b. A town in the south of Judah, (Joshua 15:29) which in Joshua 19:3 Is called BALAH, and in the parallel list, (1 Chronicles 4:29) BILHAH.
  3. BAALATH (mistress), a town of Dan named with Gibbethon, Gath-rim-mon and other Philistine places. (Joshua 19:44)
  4. BAALATH-BEER (lord of the well). BAAL 1, a town among those in the south part of Judah, given to Simeon, which also bore the name of RAMATH-NEGEB, or "the height of the south." (Joshua 19:8)
  5. BAAL-GAD (lord of fortune), used to denote the most northern, (Joshua 11:17; 12:7) or perhaps northwestern, (Joshua 13:5) point to which Joshua's victories extended. It was in all probability a Phoenician or Canaanite sanctuary of Baal under the aspect of Gad or Fortune.
  6. BAAL-HAMON (lord of a multitude), a place at which Solomon had a vineyard, evidently of great extent. (Solomon 8:11)
  7. BAAL-HAZOR (village of Baal), a place where Absalom appears to have had a sheep-farm, and where Amnon was murdered. (2 Samuel 13:23)
  8. MOUNT, MOUNT, MOUNTAIN BAAL-HERMON (Lord of Hermon), (Judges 3:3) and simply Baal-hermon. (1 Chronicles 5:23) This is usually considered as a distinct place from Mount Hermon; but we know that this mountain had at least three names (3:9) and Baal-hermon may have been a fourth in use among the Phoenician worshippers.
  9. BAAL-MEON (lord of the house), one of the towns which were built by the Reubenites. (Numbers 32:38) It also occurs in (1 Chronicles 5:8) and on each occasion with Nebo. In the time of Ezekiel it was Moabite, one of the cities which were the "glory of the country." (Ezekiel 25:9)
  10. BAAL-PERAZIM (lord of divisions), the scene of a victory of David over the Philistines, and of a great destruction of their images. (2 Samuel 5:20; 1 Chronicles 14:11) See (Isaiah 28:21) where it is called MOUNT, MOUNT, MOUNTAIN PERAZIM.
  11. BAAL-SHALISHA (lord of Shalisha), a place named only in (2 Kings 4:42) apparently not far from Gilgal; comp. (2 Kings 4:38)
  12. BAAL-TAMAR (lord of the palm tree), a place named only in (Judges 20:33) as near Gibeah of Benjamin. The palm tree (tamar) of Deborah, (Judges 4:5) was situated somewhere in the locality, and is possibly alluded to.
  13. BAAL-ZEPHON (lord of the north), a place in Egypt near where the Isr'lites crossed the Red Sea. (Numbers 33:7; Ezekiel 14:2,9) We place Baal-zephon on the western shore of the Gulf of Suez, a little below its head, which at that time was about 30 or 40 miles northward of the Present head.


Easton's Bible Dictionary
Cushan

Probably a poetic or prolonged name of the land of Cush, the Arabian Cush (Habakkuk 3:7). Some have, however, supposed this to be the same as Chushan-rishathaim (Judges 3:8, 10), i.e., taking the latter part of the name as a title or local appellation, Chushan "of the two iniquities" (= oppressing Israel, and provoking them to idolatry), a Mesopotamian king, identified by Rawlinson with Asshur-ris-ilim (the father of Tiglathpileser I.); but incorrectly, for the empire of Assyria was not yet founded. He held Israel in bondage for eight years.


Naves Topical Index
Cushan

Poetic form of Cush.
Habakkuk 3:7
Ethiopia


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Cushan

(blackness), (Habakkuk 3:7) possibly the same as Cushan-rishathaim (Authorized Version Chushan-) king of Mesopotamia. (Judges 3:8,10)


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cushat

CUSHAT, noun The ring-dove or wood-pigeon.


Naves Topical Index
Cushi

1. A messenger, who brought tidings to David
2 Samuel 18:21-32

2. Father of Shelemiah
Jeremiah 36:14

3. Father of Zephaniah
Zephaniah 1:1


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Cushi

Properly "the Cushite," "the Ethiopian," a man apparently attached to Joab's person. (2 Samuel 18:21-25,31,32)


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cushion

CUSHION, noun

1. A pillow for a seat; a soft pad to be placed on a chair; a bag, stuffed with wool, hair or other soft material.

2. A bag of leather filled with sand, used by engravers to support the plate.

3. In gilding, a stuffing of fine tow or wool, covered by leather, on a board; used for receiving the leaves of gold from the paper, in order to its being cut into proper sizes and figures.

Ladys cushion a plant, a species of saxifraga.

Sea cushion sea pink or thrift, a species of Statice.

CUSHION, verb transitive To seat on a cushion


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cushioned

CUSHIONED, adjective Seated on a cushion; supported by cushions.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cushionet

CUSHIONET, noun A little cushion.


Easton's Bible Dictionary
Cushite

1. The messenger sent by Joab to David to announce his victory over Absalom (2 Samuel 18:32).

2. The father of Shelemiah (Jeremiah 36:14).

3. Son of Gedaliah, and father of the prophet Zephaniah (1:1).

4. Moses married a Cushite woman (Numbers 12:1). From this circumstance some have supposed that Zipporah was meant, and hence that Midian was Cush.