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Hadad

The Bible

Bible Usage:

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: Yes
  • Included in Hitchcocks: Yes
  • Included in Naves: Yes
  • Included in Smiths: Yes
  • Included in Websters: No
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: No
  • Included in BDB: Yes

Strongs Concordance:

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Hadad

Adod, brave(?), the name of a Syrian god.

1. An Edomite king who defeated the Midianites (Genesis 36:35; 1 Chronicles 1:46).

2. Another Edomite king (1 Chronicles 1:50, 51), called also Hadar (Genesis 36:39; 1 Chronicles 1:51).

3. One of "the king's seed in Edom." He fled into Egypt, where he married the sister of Pharaoh's wife (1 Kings 11:14-22). He became one of Solomon's adversaries.

Hadad, sharp, (a different name in Hebrew from the preceding), one of the sons of Ishmael (1 Chronicles 1:30). Called also Hadar (Genesis 25:15).


Hitchcock's Names Dictionary
Hadad

joy; noise; clamor


Naves Topical Index
Hadad

1. A successor of Husham as king of Edom. Vanquished the Midianites on the field of Moab
Genesis 36:35; 1 Chronicles 1:46

2. A son of Ishmael

General references
1 Chronicles 1:30

Called Hadar
Genesis 25:15

3. Successor of Baal-Hanan, king of Edom

General references
1 Chronicles 1:50

Called Hadar
Genesis 36:39

4. A prince of Edom, adversary of Solomon
1 Kings 11:14-22; 1 Kings 11:25


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Hadad

(mighty), originally the indigenous appellation of the sun among the Syrians, and thence transferred to the king as the highest of earthly authorities. The title appears to have been an official one, like Pharaoh. It is found occasionally in the altered form Hadar. (Genesis 25:15; 36:39) compared with 1 Chronicles 1:30,50

  1. Son of Ishm'l. (Genesis 25:15; 1 Chronicles 1:30)
  2. A king of Edom who gained an important victory over the Midianites on the field of Moab. (Genesis 36:35; 1 Chronicles 1:46)
  3. Also a king of Edom, with Pau for his capital. (1 Chronicles 1:50)
  4. A member of the royal house Or Edom. (1 Kings 11:14) ff. In his childhood he escaped the massacre under Joab, and fled with a band of followers into Egypt. Pharaoh, the predecessor of Solomon's father-in-law, treated him kindly, and gave him his sister-in-law in marriage. After David's death Hadad resolved to attempt the recovery of his dominion. He left Egypt and returned to his own country.


Easton's Bible Dictionary
Hadadezer

Hadad is help; called also Hadarezer, Adod is his help, the king of Zobah. Hanun, the king of the Ammonites, hired among others the army of Hadadezer to assist him in his war against David. Joab, who was sent against this confederate host, found them in double battle array, the Ammonities toward their capital of Rabbah, and the Syrian mercenaries near Medeba. In the battle which was fought the Syrians were scattered, and the Ammonites in alarm fled into their capital. After this Hadadezer went north "to recover his border" (2 Samuel 8:3, A.V.); but rather, as the Revised Version renders, "to recover his dominion", i.e., to recruit his forces. Then followed another battle with the Syrian army thus recruited, which resulted in its being totally routed at Helam (2 Samuel 10:17). Shobach, the leader of the Syrian army, died on the field of battle. The Syrians of Damascus, who had come to help Hadadezer, were also routed, and Damascus was made tributary to David. All the spoils taken in this war, "shields of gold" and "very much brass," from which afterwards the "brasen sea, and the pillars, and the vessels of brass" for the temple were made (1 Chronicles 18:8), were brought to Jerusalem and dedicated to Jehovah. Thus the power of the Ammonites and the Syrians was finally broken, and David's empire extended to the Euphrates (2 Samuel 10:15-19; 1 Chronicles 19:15-19).


Hitchcock's Names Dictionary
Hadadezer

beauty of assistance


Naves Topical Index
Hadadezer

Called also Hadarezer. King of Zobah, vanquished by David.
2 Samuel 8:3-13; 2 Samuel 10:15-19; 1 Kings 11:23; 1 Chronicles 18:3-10; 1 Chronicles 19:6-19


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Hadadezer

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Hadadrimmon

(composed of the names of two Syrian idols), the name of a place in the valley of Megiddo. It is alluded to by the prophet Zechariah (12:11) in a proverbial expression derived from the lamentation for Josiah, who was mortally wounded near this place (2 Chronicles 35:22-25). It has been identified with the modern Rummaneh, a village "at the foot of the Megiddo hills, in a notch or valley about an hour and a half south of Tell Metzellim."


Hitchcock's Names Dictionary
Hadadrimmon

invocation to the god Rimmon


Naves Topical Index
Hadadrimmon

A place in the valley of Megiddon.
Zech 12:11


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Hadadrimmon

is, according to the ordinary interpretation of (12:11) a place in the valley of Megiddo (a part of the plain of Esdr'lon, six miles from Mount Carmel and eleven from Nazareth), where a national lamentation was held for the death of King Josiah. It was named after two Syrian idols.