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Hagarites

The Bible

Bible Usage:

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: Yes
  • Included in Hitchcocks: Yes
  • Included in Naves: No
  • Included in Smiths: Yes
  • Included in Websters: No
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: No
  • Included in BDB: Yes

Strongs Concordance:

 

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Hagar

Flight, or, according to others, stranger, an Egyptian, Sarah's handmaid (Genesis 16:1; 21:9, 10), whom she gave to Abraham (q.v.) as a secondary wife (16:2). When she was about to become a mother she fled from the cruelty of her mistress, intending apparently to return to her relatives in Egypt, through the desert of Shur, which lay between. Wearied and worn she had reached the place she distinguished by the name of Beer-lahai-roi ("the well of the visible God"), where the angel of the Lord appeared to her. In obedience to the heavenly visitor she returned to the tent of Abraham, where her son Ishmael was born, and where she remained (16) till after the birth of Isaac, the space of fourteen years. Sarah after this began to vent her dissatisfaction both on Hagar and her child. Ishmael's conduct was insulting to Sarah, and she insisted that he and his mother should be dismissed. This was accordingly done, although with reluctance on the part of Abraham (Genesis 21:14). They wandered out into the wilderness, where Ishmael, exhausted with his journey and faint from thirst, seemed about to die. Hagar "lifted up her voice and wept," and the angel of the Lord, as before, appeared unto her, and she was comforted and delivered out of her distresses (Genesis 21:18, 19).

Ishmael afterwards established himself in the wilderness of Paran, where he married an Egyptian (Genesis 21:20, 21).

"Hagar" allegorically represents the Jewish church (Galatians 4:24), in bondage to the ceremonial law; while "Sarah" represents the Christian church, which is free.


Hitchcock's Names Dictionary
Hagar

a stranger; one that fears


Naves Topical Index
Hagar

A servant of Abraham and handmaid of Sarah.

Given by Sarah to Abraham to be his wife
Nehemiah 1:16

Descendants of
Genesis 25:12-15; 1 Chronicles 5:10; 1 Chronicles 5:19-22; Psalms 83:6

Called Agar
Galatians 4:24-25


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Hagar

(flight), an Egyptian woman, the handmaid or slave of Sarah, (Genesis 16:1) whom the latter gave as a concubine to Abraham, after he had dwelt ten years in the land of Canaan and had no children by Sarah. ch (Genesis 16:2,3) (B.C. 1912.) When Hagar saw that she had conceived, "her mistress was despised in her eyes," v. 4, and Sarah, with the anger, we may suppose, of a free woman rather than of a wife, reproached Abraham for the results of her own act. Hagar fled, turning her steps toward her native land through the great wilderness traversed by the Egyptian road. By the fountain in the way to Shur the angel of the Lord found her, charged her to return and submit herself under the hands of her mistress, and delivered the remarkable prophecy respecting her unborn child recorded in vs. 10-12. On her return she gave birth to Ishm'l, and Abraham was then eighty-six years old. When Ishm'l was about sixteen years old, he was caught by Sarah making sport of her young son Isaac at the festival of his weaning, and Sarah demanded the expulsion of Hagar and her son. She again fled toward Egypt, and when in despair at the want of water, an angel again appeared to her, pointed out a fountain close by, and renewed the former promises to her. (Genesis 21:9-21) St. Paul, (Galatians 4:25) refers to her as the type of the old covenant of the law.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Hagard

HAG'ARD, adjective

1. Literally, having a ragged look, as if hacked or gashed. Hence, lean; meager; rough; having eyes sunk in their orbits; ugly.

2. Wild; fierce; intractable; as a hagard hawk.

HAG'ARD, noun

1. Any thing wild and intractable.

2. A species of hawk.

3. A hag.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Hagardly

HAG'ARDLY, adverb In a hagard or ugly manner; with deformity.


Easton's Bible Dictionary
Hagarene

Or Hagarite.

1. One of David's mighty men (1 Chronicles 11:38), the son of a foreigner.

2. Used of Jaziz (1 Chronicles 27:31), who was over David's flocks. "A Hagarite had charge of David's flocks, and an Ishmaelite of his herds, because the animals were pastured in districts where these nomadic people were accustomed to feed their cattle."

3. In the reign of Saul a great war was waged between the trans-Jordanic tribes and the Hagarites (1 Chronicles 5), who were overcome in battle. A great booty was captured by the two tribes and a half, and they took possession of the land of the Hagarites.

Subsequently the "Hagarenes," still residing in the land on the east of Jordan, entered into a conspiracy against Israel (comp. Psalms 83:6). They are distinguished from the Ishmaelites.


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Hagarenes, Hagarites

(named after Hagar), a people dwelling to the east of Palestine, with whom the tribes of Reuben made war in the time of Saul. (1 Chronicles 5:10,18-20) The same people, as confederate against Isr'l, are mentioned in (Psalms 83:6) It is generally believed that they were named after Hagar, and that the important town and district of Hejer , on the borders of the Persian Gulf, represent them.