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Lot

The Bible

Bible Usage:

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: Yes
  • Included in Hitchcocks: Yes
  • Included in Naves: Yes
  • Included in Smiths: Yes
  • Included in Websters: Yes
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: Yes
  • Included in BDB: Yes

Strongs Concordance:

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Lot

(Heb. goral, a "pebble"), a small stone used in casting lots (Numbers 33:54; Jonah 1:7). The lot was always resorted to by the Hebrews with strictest reference to the interposition of God, and as a method of ascertaining the divine will (Proverbs 16:33), and in serious cases of doubt (Esther 3:7). Thus the lot was used at the division of the land of Canaan among the serveral tribes (Numbers 26:55; 34:13), at the detection of Achan (Joshua 7:14, 18), the election of Saul to be king (1 Samuel 10:20, 21), the distribution of the priestly offices of the temple service (1 Chronicles 24:3, 5, 19; Luke 1:9), and over the two goats at the feast of Atonement (Leviticus 16:8). Matthias, who was "numbered with the eleven" (Acts 1:24-26), was chosen by lot.

This word also denotes a portion or an inheritance (Joshua 15:1; Psalms 125:3; Isaiah 17:4), and a destiny, as assigned by God (Psalms 16:5; Daniel 12:13).

Lot, (Heb. lot), a covering; veil, the son of Haran, and nephew of Abraham (Genesis 11:27). On the death of his father, he was left in charge of his grandfather Terah (31), after whose death he accompanied his uncle Abraham into Canaan (12:5), thence into Egypt (10), and back again to Canaan (13:1). After this he separated from him and settled in Sodom (13:5-13). There his righteous soul was "vexed" from day to day (2 Peter 2:7), and he had great cause to regret this act. Not many years after the separation he was taken captive by Chedorlaomer, and was rescued by Abraham (Genesis 14). At length, when the judgment of God descended on the guilty cities of the plain (Genesis 19:1-20), Lot was miraculously delivered. When fleeing from the doomed city his wife "looked back from behind him, and became a pillar of salt." There is to this day a peculiar crag at the south end of the Dead Sea, near Kumran, which the Arabs call Bint Sheik Lot, i.e., Lot's wife. It is "a tall, isolated needle of rock, which really does bear a curious resemblance to an Arab woman with a child upon her shoulder." From the words of warning in Luke 17:32, "Remember Lot's wife," it would seem as if she had gone back, or tarried so long behind in the desire to save some of her goods, that she became involved in the destruction which fell on the city, and became a stiffened corpse, fixed for a time in the saline incrustations. She became "a pillar of salt", i.e., as some think, of asphalt. (See SALT.)

Lot and his daughters sought refuge first in Zoar, and then, fearing to remain there longer, retired to a cave in the neighbouring mountains (Genesis 19:30). Lot has recently been connected with the people called on the Egyptian monuments Rotanu or Lotanu, who is supposed to have been the hero of the Edomite tribe Lotan.


Hitchcock's Names Dictionary
Lot

Lotan, wrapt up; hidden; covered; myrrh; rosin


Naves Topical Index
Lot

1. Feast of
Purim

2. The son of Haran:

Accompanies Terah from Ur of the Chaldees to Haran
Genesis 11:31

Migrates with Abraham to the land of Canaan
Genesis 12:4

Accompanies Abraham to Egypt; returns with him to Beth-El
Genesis 13:1-3

Rich in flocks, and herds, and servants; separates from Abraham, and locates in Sodom
Genesis 13:5-14

Taken captive by Chedorlaomer; rescued by Abraham
Genesis 14:1-16

Providentially saved from destruction in Sodom
Genesis 1:19; Luke 17:28-29

Disobediently protests against going to the mountains, and chooses Zoar
Genesis 19:17-22

His wife disobediently longs after Sodom, and becomes a pillar of salt
Genesis 19:26; Luke 17:32

Commits incest with his daughters
Genesis 19:30-38

Descendants of
Ammonites; Moabites


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Lot

1. (veil or covering), the son of Haran, and therefore the nephew of Abraham. (Genesis 11:27,31) (B.C. before 1926-1898.) His sisters were Milcah the wife of Nahor, and Iscah, by some identified with Sarah. haran died before the emigration of Terah and his family from Ur of the Chaldees, ver. 28, and Lot was therefore born there. He removed with the rest of his kindred to Charran, and again subsequently with Abraham and Sarai to Canaan. ch. (Genesis 12:4,5) With them he took refuge in Egypt from a famine,a nd with them returned, first to the "south," ch. (Genesis 13:1) and then to their original settlement between Bethel and Ai. vs. (Genesis 13:3,4) But the pastures of the hills of Bethel, which had with ease contained the two strangers on their first arrival, were not able any longer to bear them, so much had their possessions of sheep, goats and cattle increased. Accordingly they separated, Lot choosing the fertile plain of the Jordan, and advancing as far as Sodom. (Genesis 13:10-14) The next occurrence in the life of Lot is his capture by the four kings of the east and his rescue by Abram. ch. (Genesis 13:14) The last scene preserved to us in the history of Lot is too well known to need repetition. He was still living in Sodom, (Genesis 19:1) ... from which he was rescued by some angels on the day of its final overthrow. he fled first to Zoar, in which he found a temporary refuge during the destruction of the other cities of the plain. Where this place was situated is not known with certainty. [ZOAR] The end of Lot's wife is commonly treated as one of the difficulties of the Bible; but it surely need not be so. It cannot be necessary to create the details of the story where none are given. On these points the record is silent. The value and the significance of the story to us are contained in the allusion of Christ. (Luke 17:32) Later ages have not been satisfied so to leave the matter, but have insisted on identifying the "pillar" with some one of the fleeting forms which the perishable rock of the south end of the Dead Sea is constantly assuming in its process of decomposition and liquefaction. From the incestuous intercourse between Lot and his two daughters sprang the nations of Moab and Ammon.
2. (literally a pebble). The custom of deciding doubtful questions by lot is one of great extent and high antiquity. Among the Jews lots were used with the expectation that God would so control them as to give a right direction to them. They were very often used by God's appointment. "As to the mode of casting lots, we have no certain information. Probably several modes were practiced." "Very commonly among the Latins little counters of wood were put into a jar with so narrow a neck that only one could come out at a time. After the jar had been filled with water and the contents shaken, the lots were determined by the order in which the bits of wood, representing the several parties, came out with the water. in other cases they were put into a wide open jar, and the counters were drawn out by the hand. Sometimes again they were cast in the manner of dice. The soldiers who cast lots for Christ's garments undoubtedly used these dice."

Lyman Abbott.
3. In "Baal-hazor which is by Ephraim" was Absalom's sheepfarm, at which took place the murder of Amnon, one of the earliest precursors of the great revolt. (2 Samuel 13:23) There is no clue to its situation.
4. a city "in the district near the wilderness" to which our Lord retired with his disciples when threatened with violence by the priests. (John 11:54)


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Lot

LOT, noun

1. That which, in human speech, is called chance, hazard, fortune; but in strictness of language, is the determination of Providence; as, the land shall be divided by lot Numbers 26:55.

2. That by which the fate or portion of one is determined; that by which an event is committed to chance, that is, to the determination of Providence; as, to cast lots; to draw lots.

The lot is cast into the lap, but the whole disposing thereof is of the Lord. Proverbs 16:33.

3. The part, division or fate which falls to one by chance, that is, by divine determination.

The second lot came forth to Simeon. Joshua 19:1.

He was but born to try the lot of man, to suffer and to die.

4. A distinct portion or parcel; as a lot of goods; a lot of boards.

5. Proportion or share of taxes; as, to pay scot and lot

6. In the United States, a piece or division of land; perhaps originally assigned by drawing lots, but now any portion, piece or division. So we say, a man has a lot of land in Broadway, or in the meadow; he has a lot in the plain, or on the mountain; he has a home-lot, a house-lot, a wood-lot.

The defendants leased a house and lot in the city of New York.

To cast lots, is to use or throw a die, or some other instrument, by the unforseen turn or position of which, an event is by previous agreement determined.

To draw lots, to determine an event by drawing one thing from a number whose marks are concealed from the drawer, and thus determining an event.

LOT, verb transitive To allot; to assign; to distribute; to sort; to catalogue; to portion.