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Mesha

The Bible

Bible Usage:

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: Yes
  • Included in Hitchcocks: Yes
  • Included in Naves: Yes
  • Included in Smiths: Yes
  • Included in Websters: No
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: No
  • Included in BDB: Yes

Strongs Concordance:

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Mesha

Middle district, Vulgate, Messa.

1. A plain in that part of the boundaries of Arabia inhabited by the descendants of Joktan (Genesis 10:30).

2. Heb. meysh'a, "deliverance," the eldest son of Caleb (1 Chronicles 2:42), and brother of Jerahmeel.

3. Heb. id, a king of Moab, the son of Chemosh-Gad, a man of great wealth in flocks and herds (2 Kings 3:4). After the death of Ahab at Ramoth-Gilead, Mesha shook off the yoke of Israel; but on the ascension of Jehoram to the throne of Israel, that king sought the help of Jehoshaphat in an attempt to reduce the Moabites again to their former condition. The united armies of the two kings came unexpectedly on the army of the Moabites, and gained over them an easy victory. The whole land was devastated by the conquering armies, and Mesha sought refuge in his last stronghold, Kir-harasheth (q.v.). Reduced to despair, he ascended the wall of the city, and there, in the sight of the allied armies, offered his first-born son a sacrifice to Chemosh, the fire-god of the Moabites. This fearful spectacle filled the beholders with horror, and they retired from before the besieged city, and recrossed the Jordan laden with spoil (2 Kings 3:25-27).

The exploits of Mesha are recorded in the Phoenician inscription on a block of black basalt found at Dibon, in Moab, usually called the "Moabite stone" (q.v.).


Hitchcock's Names Dictionary
Mesha

burden; salvation


Naves Topical Index
Mesha

1. King of Moab. Tributary to Ahad
2 Kings 3:4-5

2. Son of Caleb
1 Chronicles 2:42

3. A place in possession of the Joktanites
Genesis 10:30

4. A Benjamite
1 Chronicles 8:9


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Mesha

(freedom).

  1. The name of one of the geographical limits of the Joktanites when they first settled in Arabia. (Genesis 10:30)
  2. The king of Moab who was tributary to Ahab, (2 Kings 3:4) but when Ahab fell at Ramoth-gilead, Mesha refused to pay tribute to his successor, Jehoram. When Jehoram succeeded to the throne of Isr'l, one of his first acts was to secure the assistance of Jehoshaphat, his father's ally, in reducing the Moabites to their former condition of tributaries. The Moabites were defeated, and the king took refuge in his last stronghold, and defended himself with the energy of despair. With 700 fighting men he made a vigorous attempt to cut his way through the beleaguering army, and when beaten back, he withdrew to the wall of his city, and there, in sight of the allied host, offered his first-born son, his successor in the kingdom, as a burnt offering to Chemosh, the ruthless fire-god of Moab. His bloody sacrifice had so far the desired effect that the besiegers retired from him to their own land. (At Dibon in Moab has lately been discovered the famous Moabite Stone, which contains inscriptions concerning King Mesha and his wars, and which confirms the Bible account.

    ED.)

  3. The eldest son of Caleb the son of Hezron by his wife Azubah, as Kimchi conjectures. (1 Chronicles 2:42)
  4. A Benjamite, son of Shabaraim by his wife Hodesh, who bore him in the land of Moab. (1 Chronicles 8:9)


Easton's Bible Dictionary
Meshach

The title given to Mishael, one of the three Hebrew youths who were under training at the Babylonian court for the rank of Magi (Daniel 1:7; 2:49; 3:12-30). This was probably the name of some Chaldean god.


Hitchcock's Names Dictionary
Meshach

that draws with force


Naves Topical Index
Meshach

A name given by the chief eunuch to Mishael, one of the three Hebrew children.
Daniel 1:7; Daniel 2:49; Daniel 3:12-30


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Meshach

(guest of a king), the name given to Mish'l, one of the companions of Daniel, who with three others was taught, (Daniel 1:4) and qualified to "stand before" King Nebuchadnezzar, (Daniel 1:5) as his personal attendants and advisers. (Daniel 1:20) But notwithstanding their Chaldeans education, these three young Hebrews were strongly attached to the religion of their fathers; and their refusal to join in the worship of the image on the plain of Dura gave a handle of accusation to the Chaldeans. The rage of the king, the swift sentence of condemnation passed upon the three offenders, their miraculous preservation from the fiery furnace heated seven times hotter than usual, the king's acknowledgement of the God of Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego, with their restoration to office, are written in the third chapter of Daniel, and there the history leaves them.