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Sala

The Bible

Bible Usage:

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: Yes
  • Included in Hitchcocks: No
  • Included in Naves: No
  • Included in Smiths: No
  • Included in Websters: No
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: Yes
  • Included in BDB: No

Strongs Concordance:

 

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Sala

A shoot, a descendant of Arphaxed (Luke 3:35, 36); called also Shelah (1 Chronicles 1:18, 24).


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Sala, or Salah

(sprout), the son of Arphaxad, and father of Eber. (Genesis 10:24; 11:18-14; Luke 3:35) (B.C. 2307.)


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Salable

SA'LABLE, adjective [from sale.] That may be sold; that finds a ready market; being in good demand.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Salableness

SA'LABLENESS, noun The state of being salable.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Salably

SA'LABLY, adverb In a salable manner.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Salacious

SALA'CIOUS, adjective [Latin salax, from the root of sal, salt; the primary sense of which is shooting, penetrating, pungent, coinciding probably with Latin salio, to leap. salacious then is highly excited, or prompt to leap.] Lustful; lecherous.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Salaciously

SALA'CIOUSLY, adverb Lustfully; with eager animal appetite.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Salaciousness

SALA'CIOUSNESS,

SALAC'ITY, noun Lust; lecherousness; strong propensity to venery.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Salad

SAL'AD, noun

Raw herbs, usually dressed with salt, vinegar, oil or spices, and eaten for giving a relish to other food.

Leaves eaten raw, are termed salad


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Salading

SAL'ADING, noun Vegetables for salads.


Hitchcock's Names Dictionary
Salah

mission; sending


Naves Topical Index
Salah

Called also Sala and Shelah. Son of Arphaxad and ancestor of Joseph.
Genesis 10:24; Genesis 11:12-15; 1 Chronicles 1:18; 1 Chronicles 1:24; Luke 3:35


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Salam

SALAM', noun [Oriental, peace or safety.] A salutation or compliment of ceremony or respect. [Not in use.]


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Salamander

SAL'AMANDER, noun [Latin Gr. salamandra.] An animal of the genus Lacerta or Lizard, one of the smaller species of the genus, not being more than six or seven inches in length. It has a short cylindrical tail, four toes on the four feet, and a naked body. The skin is furnished with small excrescences like teats, which are full of holes from which oozes a milky liquor that spreads over the skin, forming a kind of transparent varnish. The eyes are placed in the upper part of the head. The color is dark, with a bluish cast on the belly, intermixed with irregular yellow spots. This animal is oviparous, inhabits cold damp places among trees or hedges, avoiding the heat of the sun. The vulgar story of its being able to endure fire, is a mistake.

Salamander's hair or wool, a name given to a species of asbestos or mineral flax; I believe no long used.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Salamandrine

SALAMAN'DRINE, adjective Pertaining to or resembling a salamander; enduring fire.

Sal ammoniac, muriate of ammonia. The native sal ammoniac is of two kinds, volcanic and conchoidal.


Easton's Bible Dictionary
Salamis

A city on the south-east coast of Cyprus (Acts 13:5), where Saul and Barnabas, on their first missionary journey, preached the word in one of the Jewish synagogues, of which there seem to have been several in that place. It is now called Famagusta.


Hitchcock's Names Dictionary
Salamis

shaken; test; beaten


Naves Topical Index
Salamis

A city of Cyprus. Paul and Barnabas preach in.
Acts 13:4-5


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Salamis

(suit), a city at the east end of the island of Cyprus, and the first place visited by Paul and Barnabas, on the first missionary journey, after leaving the mainland at Seleucia. Here alone, among all the Greek cities visited by St. Paul, we read expressly of "synagogues" in the plural, (Acts 13:5) hence we conclude that there were many Jews in Cyprus. And this is in harmony with what we read elsewhere. Salamis was not far from the modern Famagousta , it was situated near a river called the Pedi'us, on low ground, which is in fact a continuation of the plain running up into the interior toward the place where Nicosia , the present capital of Cyprus, stands.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Salaried

SAL'ARIED, adjective Enjoying a salary.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Salary

SAL'ARY, noun [Latin salarium; said to be from sal, salt, which was part of the pay of Roman soldiers.]

The recompense or consideration stipulated to be paid to a person for services, usually a fixed sum to be paid by the year, as to governors, magistrates, settled clergymen, instructors of seminaries, or other officers, civil or ecclesiastical. When wages are stated or stipulated by the month, week or day, we do not call the compensation salary but pay or wages; as in the case of military men and laborers.


Easton's Bible Dictionary
Salathiel

Whom I asked of God, the son of Jeconiah (Matthew 1:12; 1 Chronicles 3:17); also called the son of Neri (Luke 3:27). The probable explanation of the apparent discrepancy is that he was the son of Neri, the descendant of Nathan, and thus heir to the throne of David on the death of Jeconiah (comp. Jeremiah 22:30).


Hitchcock's Names Dictionary
Salathiel

asked or lent of God


Naves Topical Index
Salathiel

See Shealtiel
Shealtiel


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Salathiel

(I have asked of God). (1 Chronicles 3:17) The Authorized Version has Salathiel in (1 Chronicles 3:17) but everywhere else in the Old Testament Shealtiel.