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Succoth

The Bible

Bible Usage:

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: Yes
  • Included in Hitchcocks: Yes
  • Included in Naves: Yes
  • Included in Smiths: Yes
  • Included in Websters: No
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: No
  • Included in BDB: Yes

Strongs Concordance:

 

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Succoth

Booths.

1. The first encampment of the Israelites after leaving Ramesses (Exodus 12:37); the civil name of Pithom (q.v.).

2. A city on the east of Jordan, identified with Tell Dar'ala, a high mound, a mass of debris, in the plain north of Jabbok and about one mile from it (Joshua 13:27). Here Jacob (Genesis 32:17, 30; 33:17), on his return from Padan-aram after his interview with Esau, built a house for himself and made booths for his cattle. The princes of this city churlishly refused to afford help to Gideon and his 300 men when "faint yet pursuing" they followed one of the bands of the fugitive Midianites after the great victory at Gilboa. After overtaking and routing this band at Karkor, Gideon on his return visited the rulers of the city with severe punishment. "He took the elders of the city, and thorns of the wilderness and briers, and with them he taught the men of Succoth" (Judges 8:13-16). At this place were erected the foundries for casting the metal-work for the temple (1 Kings 7:46).


Hitchcock's Names Dictionary
Succoth

tents; tabernacles


Naves Topical Index
Succoth

1. A city probably east of the Jordan:

Jacob builds a house in
Genesis 33:17

Allotted to Gad
Joshua 13:27

People of, punished by Gideon
Judges 8:5-8; Judges 8:14-16

Located near the Jordan
1 Kings 7:46; 2 Chronicles 4:17; Psalms 60:6; Psalms 108:7

2. First camping place of the Israelites on leaving Rameses
Exodus 12:37; Exodus 13:20; Numbers 33:5-6


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Succoth

(booths).

  1. An ancient town, first heard of in the account of the homeward journey of Jacob from Padan-aram. (Genesis 35:17) The name is derived from the fact of Jacob's having there put up "booths" (succoth) for his cattle as well as a house for himself. From the itinerary of Jacob's return it seems that Succoth lay between Peniel, near the ford of the torrent Jabbok and Shechem. Comp. (Genesis 32:30) and Genesis 33:18 In accordance with this is the mention of Succoth in the narrative of Gideon's pursuit of Zebah and Zalluunna. (Judges 5:5-17) It would appear from this passage that it lay east of the Jordan, which is corroborated by the fact that it was allotted to the tribe of Gad. (Joshua 13:27) Succoth is named once again after this

    in (1 Kings 7:46; 2 Chronicles 4:17)

    as marking the spot at which the brass founderies were placed for casting the metal work of the temple. (Dr. Merrill identifies it with a site called Tell Darala , one mile north of the Jabbok. --ED.)

  2. The first camping-place of the Isr'lites when they left Egypt. (Exodus 12:37; 13:20; Numbers 33:5,6) This place was apparently reached at the close of the first days march. Rameses, the starting-place, was probably near the western end of the Wadi-t-Tumeylat . The distance traversed in each day's journey was about fifteen miles.


Easton's Bible Dictionary
Succothbenoth

Tents of daughters, supposed to be the name of a Babylonian deity, the goddess Zir-banit, the wife of Merodach, worshipped by the colonists in Samaria (2 Kings 17:30).


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Succothbenoth

Occurs only in (2 Kings 17:30) It has generally been supposed that this term is pure Hebrew, and signifies the tents of daughters; which some explain as "the booths in which the daughters of the Babylonians prostituted themselves in honor of their idol," others as "small tabernacles in which were contained images of female deities." Sir H. Rawlinson thinks that Succoth-benoth represents the Chald'an goddess Zerbanit , the wife of Merodach, who was especially worshipped at Babylon.


Hitchcock's Names Dictionary
Succoth-benoth

the tents of daughters, or young women; or prostitutes