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Vinegar

The Bible

Bible Usage:

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: Yes
  • Included in Hitchcocks: No
  • Included in Naves: Yes
  • Included in Smiths: Yes
  • Included in Websters: Yes
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: Yes
  • Included in BDB: Yes

Strongs Concordance:

 

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Vinegar

Heb. hometz, Gr. oxos, Fr. vin aigre; i.e., "sour wine." The Hebrew word is rendered vinegar in Psalms 69:21, a prophecy fulfilled in the history of the crucifixion (Matthew 27:34). This was the common sour wine (posea) daily made use of by the Roman soldiers. They gave it to Christ, not in derision, but from compassion, to assuage his thirst. Proverbs 10:26 shows that there was also a stronger vinegar, which was not fit for drinking. The comparison, "vinegar upon nitre," probably means "vinegar upon soda" (as in the marg. of the R.V.), which then effervesces.


Naves Topical Index
Vinegar

A sour wine.

Forbidden to Nazarites
Numbers 6:3

Used with food
Ruth 2:14; Psalms 69:21; Proverbs 10:26; Proverbs 25:20

Offered to Christ on the cross
Matthew 27:34; Matthew 27:48; John 19:29; Mark 15:23


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Vinegar

The Hebrew word translated "vinegar" was applied to a beverage consisting generally of wine or strong drink turned sour, but sometimes artificially made by an admixture of barley and wine, and thus liable to fermentation. It was acid even to a proverb, (Proverbs 10:26) and by itself formed an unpleasant draught, (Psalms 49:21) but was used by laborers. (Ruth 2:14) Similar was the acetum of the Romans

a thin, sour wine, consumed by soldiers. This was the beverage of which the Saviour partook in his dying moments. (Matthew 27:48; Mark 15:36; John 19:29,30)


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Vinegar

VIN'EGAR, noun

1. Vegetable acid; an acid liquor obtained from wine, cider, beer or other liquors, by the second or acetous fermentation. vinegar may differ indefinitely in the degree of its acidity. When highly concentrated, it is called radical vinegar

2. Any thing really or metaphorically sour. [Not in use.]

Vinegar of lead, a liquor formed by digesting ceruse or litharge with a sufficient quantity of vinegar to dissolve it.