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King James Bible Dictionary

 

Moment

The Bible

Bible Usage:

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: No
  • Included in Hitchcocks: No
  • Included in Naves: No
  • Included in Smiths: No
  • Included in Websters: Yes
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: Yes
  • Included in BDB: Yes

Strongs Concordance:

Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Moment

MO'MENT, noun [Latin momentum. This word is contracted from motamentum, or some other word, the radical verb of which signified to move, rush, drive or fall suddenly, which sense gives that of force. The sense of an instant of time is from falling or rushing, which accords well with that of meet.]

1. The most minute and indivisible part of time; an instant.

In a moment in the twinkling of an eye. 1 Corinthians 15:52.

2. Force; impulsive power.

--Touch with lightest moment of impulse,

His free will.

Little used; but hence,

3. Importance in influence or effect; consequence; weight or value.

It is an abstruse speculation, but also of far less moment to us than the others.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Momental

MOMENT'AL, adjective Important. [Not in use.]


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Momentally

MOMENT'ALLY, adverb For a moment.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Momentaneous

MOMENTANEOUS, MOMENTANY, not used. [See Momentary.]


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Momentany

MOMENTANEOUS, MOMENTANY not used. [See Momentary.]


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Momentarily

MO'MENTARILY, adverb Every moment.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Momentary

MO'MENTARY, adjective Done in a moment; continuing only a moment; lasting a very short time; as a momentary pang.

Momentary as a sound,

Swift as a shadow, short as any dream.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Momently

MO'MENTLY, adverb For a moment.

1. In a moment; every moment. We momently expect the arrival of the mail.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Momentous

MOMENT'OUS, adjective Important; weighty; of consequence. Let no false step be made in the momentous concerns of the soul.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Momentum

MOMENT'UM, noun [Latin] In mechanics, impetus; the quantity of motion in a moving body. This is always equal to the quantity of matter multiplied into the velocity.